Episode 17 Annoucement

On the 4th August 1920, the police discovers in the train station in Nancy (East of France) a large box shipped from Paris containing the body of Georges Bassarabo, killed with a gun shot.

In a weird case strangely connected to the Landru affair (previous episode), everybody lies, and the consequences are a matter of life and death.

Episode 16 Announcement

In Fench, anonymous letters are said to come from “the crow”. This week’s episode will look into the affair that is at the origin of that expression: a small countryside city, Tulle, the capital of the Corrèze department, is terrorised for 4 years by anonymous letters telling people’s secrets and insulting even the local priest.

Episode 14 Announcement

As it’s the height of summer, in Episode 14 we’ll be looking at the murder of a high profile, English Chemist and his family whilst on holiday. Was it a spur of the moment act, or a pre-planned mission masterminded from behind the iron curtain?

Episode 13 Announcement

The assassination of Gaston Calmette by Henriette Caillaux

On the 28th July 1914, the French finance minister’s wife is acquitted of the murder of the director of the Figaro, one of the largest newspapers in the country. On the same day, the first world war starts.

Episode 12 Announcement

Episode 12 will take us to the South-East of France, where some murders occur without even a suspect being identified. The murders are particularly gruesome, with what appears to be ritualistic mutilations. One instructing judge will have a stroke of genius and develop the first profile to catch the killer.

Episode 11 Announcement

The week’s podcast is a high profile, lady of mystery that finds herself on two sides of the “war to the end all wars”. She criss-crossed the battle lines, hoping from bed to bed indulging in pillow talk with high profile, powerful figures, including the French minister of war. Mata Hari, an exotic South East Asian mystery, that was a fiction of a European woman who got herself in to hot water, and lost her life because of supposed carnal appetites. But did she really indirectly cause the death of thousands of men?